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English

Year 7

 

Year 8

 

Year 9

 

 

Year 7 Topic

Core Learning Objectives

Assessment

Non-fiction Writing Styles

(theme park topic)

Students read and appreciate a range of non-fiction writing styles exploring the generic features of different styles of writing.  Reading materials are used as stimulus for producing their own non-fiction texts.  The unit also offers opportunity to assess students’ speaking and listening, either through group or individual presentations. 

 

75a) Match writing style, tone & formality to GAP

75b) Convey a clear viewpoint & sustained viewpoint

75c) Use devices to maintain my reader’s interest

75d) Use clearly linked paragraphs appropriately

75e) Order overall structure – coherence & logic

76a) Choose increasingly ambitious – but appropriate - vocabulary to maintain my reader’s interest

76b) Competently use a variety of sentence lengths

76c) Controlled simple, compound and some types of complex sentence - relative clauses & embedded subclauses

76d) Use a variety of punctuation (commas, brackets, dashes, exclamation marks, question marks, semi-colons, colons)

76e) Competent spelling –common function and lexical words, homophones and frequently mistaken words, and correct prefixes and suffixes

77a) Use appropriate planning

77b) Edit vocabulary, grammar, punctuation and content to enhance meaning and effect and proofread work effectively

Writing Assessment: Students complete a piece of writing for a non-fiction purpose, audience and genre, which should be one of the purposes / genres for which they have practised writing during the scheme. However, the task itself should be different i.e. planned and written in assessment conditions. To be marked on all the Writing core learning objectives.

Short Mystery Stories

Students learn about the generic features of the genre, analyse the structure of short stories and explore a range of techniques, such as imagery and settings, which writers use to create suspense. They experiment with using these conventions and techniques in their own writing.

72a) Identify the form of a text and explain its features

72b) Comment on language choices and general effect

72c) Comment on structural choices and general effect

72d) Use some subject terminology*

75a) Match writing style, tone & formality to GAP

75b) Convey a clear, sustained viewpoint (here, in terms of controlled narrative perspective)

75c) Use devices to maintain my reader’s interest

75d) Use clearly linked paragraphs appropriately

75e) Order overall structure – coherence & logic

76a) Choose increasingly ambitious – but appropriate - vocabulary to maintain my reader’s interest

76b) Competently use a variety of sentence lengths

76c) Controlled simple, compound and some types of complex sentence - relative clauses & embedded subclauses

76d) Use a variety of punctuation (commas, brackets, dashes, exclamation marks, question marks, semi-colons, colons)

76e) Competent spelling –common function and lexical words, homophones and frequently mistaken words, and correct prefixes and suffixes

77a) Use appropriate planning methods to note down and develop my initial ideas

77b) Edit my work, proposing some appropriate changes to vocabulary, grammar, punctuation and content to enhance meaning and effect and proofread work effectively

Writing Assessment: To write up a final version of the mystery short story that they have planned and drafted sections for during the course of the scheme. This assessment gives students the experience in planning and editing writing, building up competency and thoroughness, before having to do original writing tasks in less planned and more strictly timed conditions in Years 8 and 9. To be marked on all the Writing core learning objectives.

Contemporary Novel

(Private Peaceful / Eleven Eleven)

Students read a contemporary novel and explore the writer’s craft including work on language, characters and setting.  The scheme is an opportunity for students to develop analytical skills and focus on empathetic and/or descriptive writing.  Students also study some WWI poetry as part of this scheme.

71a) Describe & summarise texts

71b) Identify relevant points

71c) Use well-chosen quotations

71d) Explain some implied meanings using evidence

72b) writer’s language choices and general effect

72c) writer’s structural choices and general effect

72d) subject terminology*

73a) Clearly identify the writer’s viewpoint and purpose

74a) Link ideas / attitudes to context

75a) Match writing style to task

75c) use devices to maintain my reader’s interest

76a) * Increasingly ambitious – but appropriate - vocabulary 76b) * Use a variety of sentence lengths

(Optional depending upon descriptive writing opportunities in scheme)

Assessment Task:

-Private Peaceful: Reading Assessment based upon the poem ‘Dulce and Decorum Est’ marked on reading CLOs specified above

-Eleven Eleven:  Reading Assessment based upon extract from Chapter 12 and marked on reading core learning objectives.

Introduction to Drama (Dracula)

Students study a complete play learning the conventions of scriptwriting and engaging with characters and themes.  They begin to understand stagecraft and explore a range of approaches to performing a play, working collaboratively to develop drama skills. They also so some analytical work focusing on quotations, inference and language analysis using extracts from the original novel.

 

71a) Describe & summarise texts

71b) Identify relevant points

71c) Use well-chosen quotations

71d) Explain some implied meanings using evidence

72a) Identify the form of a text and explain its features

72b) writer’s language choices and general effect

72c) writer’s structural choices and general effect

72d) subject terminology*

73a) Clearly identify the writer’s viewpoint and purpose

74a) Link ideas / attitudes to context

 

Reading Assessment on extract from Dracula novel, based on all the Reading core learning objectives specified above (except 72a and 74a as they aren’t relevant to the extract from novel)

 

Introduction to Shakespeare

Students use a variety of resources to research the life and works of Shakespeare, including historical, cultural and social context and the theatre of the time.  They read parts of one play and short story versions.  Students consider language change and begin to work with Shakespearean language. They also do some close extract analysis of a couple of scenes from ‘Macbeth’

71a) Describe & summarise texts

71b) Identify relevant points

71c) Use well-chosen quotations

71d) Explain some implied meanings using evidence

72a) Identify the form of a text and explain its features

72b) writer’s language choices and general effect

72c) writer’s structural choices and general effect

72d) subject terminology*

74a) Link ideas / attitudes to context

Reading Assessment: on extract from just after Duncan’s murder, exploring whether Macbeth or Lady Macbeth seem more villainous, and moving out to play as a whole (GCSE style). To be marked on all core learning objectives.

Comparing Fairy Tales

Students study fairy tales as a literary genre, considering how they have changed over time through analysis of some Grimm Fairy tales, some mid-20th century Disney adaptations, and ‘Shrek’, ‘Frozen’, and modern children’s stories.  Students learn how to interpret the viewpoints conveyed by text and how these are influenced by society’s ideologies. Students learn some comparative skills as well as essay planning.

71a) Describe & summarise texts

71b) Identify relevant points

73a) Clearly identify the writer’s viewpoint and purpose

73b) Identify some similarities and differences between texts, giving examples including some quotations

73c) Competently offer some evaluative comments / opinions about the text, giving examples including quotations

74a) Link writer’s attitudes in the text to the context (social / historical / cultural setting) in which the text was written

Reading Assessment: Comparative essay comparing how modern texts such as Shrek and Frozen subvert the conventions of traditional fairy tales to convey more modern moral messages. To be assessed on all core learning objectives. Nb. This is the only point in Year 7 where 73) comparison is assessed.

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Year 8 Topic

Core Learning Objectives

Assessment Opportunities

Non-fiction Writing Styles (primarily)

(Titanic or Spies topic)

Students develop their understanding of the generic features of a range of non-fiction writing styles.  They develop their ability to adapt these conventions to suit a range of purposes and contexts.  The unit also offers opportunity to assess students’ speaking and listening, either through group or individual presentations. 

85a) Consistently match tone, style and level of formality to purpose and audience throughout a piece of writing

85b) Use a range of devices for effect throughout a piece of writing

85c) Maintain control of clarity throughout my writing

85d) Use paragraphs to help enable me achieve my purpose in writing (e.g. by varying paragraph lengths to create emphasis)

85e) Sequence all of my ideas logically, so my writing has a clear overall structure appropriate for its purpose

86a) Consistently use an ambitious range of vocabulary to create impact and engage my reader throughout a piece of writing

86b) Consistently manipulate a range of simple, compound and complex sentence structures to achieve different effects

86c) Use a full range of punctuation (including question marks, exclamation marks, apostrophes, hyphens, brackets, semi-colons, and colons) with very few errors

86d) Spell a variety of vocabulary correctly, most of the time

87a) Use appropriate planning methods to note down and develop my initial ideas

87b) Manage my time in order to edit my work (consistently identifying opportunities to enhance vocabulary, grammar, punctuation, spelling and content) and proofread it effectively (eradicating errors in subject-verb agreement and tenses)

Writing Assessment: (non-fiction -persuade / argue / inform / explain) Students produce a piece of writing for a non-fiction purpose / audience (i.e. building towards GCSE Paper 2). Assessed on all Writing core learning objectives.

Pre-1914 Murder Mystery

(The Hound of the Baskervilles)

Students develop their confidence in comprehending and analysing pre-1914 texts, both fiction and non-fiction, through analysing extracts of ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’ and through examining contemporary non-fiction sources. The unit also offers opportunity to take part in a drama roleplay by taking on the role of detective or murder suspect

81c) Base all my ideas securely on textual evidence (quotation)

81d) Explore different layers of meaning with an increasing level of understanding, using quotation to support inferences

82b) Consistently explore, in some detail, how more obvious language choices affect the reader

82c) Use subject terminology*, including word classes and grammatical terminology, as well as terms for linguistic devices, with increasing accuracy and always with supportive quotations

82d) Discuss a range of writer(s’) methods

85a) Consistently match tone, style and level of formality to purpose and audience throughout a piece of writing

85b) Use a range of devices for effect throughout a piece of writing

85c) Maintain control of clarity throughout my writing

85d) Use paragraphs to help enable me achieve my purpose in writing (e.g. by varying paragraph lengths to create emphasis)

85e) Sequence all of my ideas logically, so my writing has a clear overall structure appropriate for its purpose

86a) Consistently use an ambitious range of vocabulary to create impact and engage my reader throughout a piece of writing

86b) Consistently manipulate a range of simple, compound and complex sentence structures to achieve different effects

86c) Use a full range of punctuation (including question marks, exclamation marks, apostrophes, hyphens, brackets, semi-colons, and colons) with very few errors

86d) Spell a variety of vocabulary correctly, most of the time

87a) Use appropriate planning methods to note down and develop my initial ideas

87b) Manage my time in order to edit my work (consistently identifying opportunities to enhance vocabulary, grammar, punctuation, spelling and content) and proofread it effectively (eradicating errors in subject-verb agreement and tenses)

Writing Assessment: (narrative writing) Write an extract from a mystery story (stylistically based upon extracts from Sherlock Holmes they have read) but based upon a fictional murder in the East End that they’ve roleplayed (the investigation - not the murder!)

Assessed on all Writing core learning objectives.

Contemporary Novel

(My Swordhand is Singing / The Ruby in the Smoke)

Students read a more challenging contemporary novel and continue to explore and develop their understanding of the writer’s craft.  This includes work on language, characters and setting.  Students further develop analytical and empathetic/descriptive writing skills. 

81a) Consistently describe and summarise – with accuracy and understanding - a more challenging range of texts

81b) Draw together ideas from different points of a text or different sources

81c) Base all my ideas securely on textual evidence (quotation)

81d) Explore different layers of meaning with an increasing level of understanding, using quotation to support inferences

82a) Consistently explore, in some detail, how structural choices support writers’ intentions

82b) Consistently explore, in some detail, how more obvious language choices affect the reader

82c) Use subject terminology*, including word classes and grammatical terminology, as well as terms for linguistic devices, with increasing accuracy and always with supportive quotations

82d) Discuss a range of writer(s’) methods

*84a) Consistently connect the writer’s ideas and attitudes to different aspects of context (social / historical / cultural setting/ genre conventions) and explain these connections in some detail

85a) Consistently match tone, style and level of formality to purpose and audience throughout a piece of writing

*85b) Use a range of devices for effect throughout a piece

*85c) Consistently sequence ideas logically, as well as clearly structure whole texts across a range of contexts

*85d) Use paragraphs to help enable me achieve my purpose in writing (e.g. by varying paragraph lengths to create emphasis)

*86e) Consistently manipulate a range of simple, compound and complex sentence structures to achieve different effects

*86f) Use a full range of punctuation (including question marks, exclamation marks, apostrophes, hyphens, brackets, semi-colons, and colons) with very few errors

*87a) Consistently use appropriate planning methods to note down and develop my initial ideas

Assessment Task:

Ruby in the Smoke: Writing Assessment – use creative writing skills to write a section of a chapter explaining what happens Adelaide in the style of the novel.

Ruby in the Smoke: Reading assessment with focus upon character Mrs Holland. Extract & whole text essay with scaffolded planning

Swordhand: Reading Assessment (GCSE Language exam style) Lesson 16 marked on all 81 and 82 Core learning objectives above.

Drama (Extracts from Nicholas Nickleby and Our Day Out)

Students study and compare sections from plays, beginning to consider genre and how this is explored in the style and plot of the play.  They develop their understanding of stagecraft and explore a range of approaches to performing a play, working collaboratively to develop drama skills. 

 

81c – quotes

81d – inferences

81a – features of form

81d – terminology

84a) Discuss how more than one aspect of the context (social / historical / political / cultural / genre conventions) in which texts are written, read or set affects reader / audience response

83c) Offer evaluative comments / opinions about a text, consistently supported by quotations

83a) Clearly explain writers’ viewpoints and purposes

83b) Make clear and quite detailed comparative points, using quotations to support these

82b) Explore, in some detail, how more obvious language choices affect the reader.

Reading Assessment – Essay comparing the writers’ viewpoints about schools in extracts from Nicholas Nickleby playscript and ‘Our Day Out’

 

Poetry and Place: Comparing poems

Students study a range of predominantly modern poetry focusing on the theme of place; they study poems from a variety of other cultures and also poems about Manchester. They learn some poetic terms to analyse the poems and use discussion as a tool to clarify their ideas.  They also learn how to draw comparisons between ideas and techniques.  Students work interactively with the texts, experimenting both with modern adaptations and utilising techniques studied in their own writing.

81a) Consistently describe and summarise – with accuracy and understanding - a more challenging range of texts

81b) Draw together ideas from different points of a text or different sources

81c) Base all my ideas securely on textual evidence (quotation)

81d) Explore different layers of meaning with an increasing level of understanding, using quotation to support inferences

82a) Consistently explore, in some detail, how structural choices support writers’ intentions

82b) Consistently explore, in some detail, how more obvious language choices affect the reader

82c) Use subject terminology*, including word classes and grammatical terminology, as well as terms for linguistic devices, with increasing accuracy and always with supportive quotations

82d) Discuss a range of writer(s’) methods

83a) Consistently and clearly explain writers’ viewpoints and purposes

83b) Consistently make clear and quite detailed comparative points, using quotations to support these

83c) Consistently offer evaluative comments / opinions about a text, consistently supported by quotations

*84a) Consistently connect the writer’s ideas and attitudes to different aspects of context (social / historical / cultural setting/ genre conventions) and explain these connections in some detail

Assessment Task:

Reading Assessment:

To write an analytical essay comparing how poets present their ideas about a topic common to the two poems. Marked on all 81, 82 and 83 Core learning objectives (and 84 if relevant to task).

 

Shakespeare

The Tempest or A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Students develop their understanding of Shakespeare by studying a specific play.  They gain an overall understanding of the play through a variety of means and undertake core learning objectives analysis of one or two sections.  Students consider language change and participate in a range of activities that encourage familiarity with and enjoyment of the play. 

81a) Consistently describe and summarise – with accuracy and understanding - a more challenging range of texts

81b) Draw together ideas from different points of a text or different sources

81c) Base all my ideas securely on textual evidence (quotation)

81d) Explore different layers of meaning with an increasing level of understanding, using quotation to support inferences

82a) Consistently explore, in some detail, how structural choices support writers’ intentions

82b) Consistently explore, in some detail, how more obvious language choices affect the reader

82c) Use subject terminology*, including word classes and grammatical terminology, as well as terms for linguistic devices, with increasing accuracy and always with supportive quotations

82d) Discuss a range of writer(s’) methods

*84a) Consistently connect the writer’s ideas and attitudes to different aspects of context (social / historical / cultural setting/ genre conventions) and explain these connections in some detail.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Reading Assessment GCSE style extract question about presentation of nature (scaffolded). To be marked on all Core learning objectives specified above

The Tempest: Reading Assessment – exploring how power and control is presented in the opening scenes.)

 

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Year 9 Topic

Core Learning Objectives

Assessment Opportunities

Original Writing

Students develop their extended fiction writing skills.  Reading materials are used as stimulus for producing their own fiction texts and they will revisit the range of techniques that can be used to create figurative effects and narrative voice.  Students take advantage of a drafting process in order to improve the quality of their writing.   

 

95a) Clearly and completely effectively match style, tone and register to the audience and purpose of the task

95b) Effectively use an ambitious but carefully selected range of devices to maintain my reader’s interest and suit my purpose

95c) Write with a distinctive voice, which I maintain throughout the individual piece of writing

95d) Craft paragraphs for effect so that they are key to conveying my meaning and purpose, paying careful attention to structural details within and between paragraphs

95e) Skilfully shape the overall structure to achieve the desired effect upon my reader

96a) Effectively select words and phrases from an impressive vocabulary to maintain my reader’s interest and create impact

96b) Effectively craft a wide variety of sentence types with only rare losses of control

96c) Effectively control a range of punctuation for impact, in addition to grammatical accuracy (for example, controlling the nuances implied by colon vs semi-colon when linking independent clauses)

96d) Spell an ambitious range of vocabulary correctly throughout my writing, with only very occasional errors

97a) Effectively use appropriate planning methods to note down and develop my initial ideas

Effectively and independently edit and proofread my work to enhance vocabulary, grammar, punctuation and content, eradicating all but the most challenging spelling and punctuation errors

Writing Assessment - Students produce a piece of creative (descriptive / narrative writing) from a choice of two tasks each based on a visual stimulus. They have 45 minutes to produce their writing in the assessment but are allowed to complete planning for this prior to the assessment.

 

Travel Writing

Students develop their understanding of the generic features of different types of travel writing.  Reading materials are used as stimulus for producing their own non-fiction texts and they develop their ability to adapt the conventions to suit a range of purposes and contexts.

95a) Clearly and completely effectively match style, tone and register to the audience and purpose of the task

95b) Effectively use an ambitious but carefully selected range of devices to maintain my reader’s interest and suit my purpose

95c) Write with a distinctive voice, which I maintain throughout the individual piece of writing

95d) Craft paragraphs for effect so that they are key to conveying my meaning and purpose, paying careful attention to structural details within and between paragraphs

95e) Skilfully shape the overall structure to achieve the desired effect upon my reader

96a) Effectively select words and phrases from an impressive vocabulary to maintain my reader’s interest and create impact

96b) Effectively craft a wide variety of sentence types with only rare losses of control

96c) Effectively control a range of punctuation for impact, in addition to grammatical accuracy (for example, controlling the nuances implied by colon vs semi-colon when linking independent clauses)

96d) Spell an ambitious range of vocabulary correctly throughout my writing, with only very occasional errors

97a) Effectively use appropriate planning methods to note down and develop my initial ideas

97b) Effectively and independently edit and proofread my work to enhance vocabulary, grammar, punctuation and content, eradicating all but the most challenging spelling and punctuation

Writing Assessment – Students complete a piece of travel writing about Manchester for one of the purposes (e.g. persuade / inform) they have learnt about over the scheme. They should not have written about Manchester for that purpose prior to the task.

 

Contemporary Novel

(Billy Elliot / Heroes / Woman in Black / Kes)

Students will read a more challenging contemporary novel and continue to explore and develop their understanding of the writer’s craft.  This should include work on language, characters and setting.  This is an opportunity for students to further develop analytical skills and focus on empathetic and/or descriptive writing. 

91a Effectively summarise and evaluate challenging texts

91b Use apt and precise quotations to support all my ideas

91c Effectively evaluate implied meanings and alternative interpretations suggested by quotations

92a Effectively analyse a range of the writer’s language methods, evaluating the impact on reader

92b Effectively analyse structural features, evaluating the impact on the reader

92c Use a range of subject terminology* (including word classes, grammatical terminology and terms for linguistic devices) with accuracy and apt supportive quotation

94a Evaluate different interpretations of the text informed by your understanding of the different contexts (social / historical / political / cultural / genre conventions) in which they have been written and received

97 Shape and paragraph my ideas skilfully in order to develop a cohesive and convincing argument

Billy Elliot: Reading Assessment

Women in Black: Writing Assessment – Descriptive writing piece either writing an extra scene for the novel or writing a description of the appearance of a ghost in a descriptive style. Assessed on all writing Core learning objectives

Heroes: Writing Assessment – Write an empathetic piece about one the protagonist’s emotional conflict. Assessed on all Writing Core learning objectives

Kes: Writing Assessment

Assessed on all Writing Core learning objectives

Shakespeare

Either Much Ado About Nothing or Romeo and Juliet

Students continue to develop their understanding of Shakespeare by studying a specific play.  They gain an overall understanding of the play through a variety of means and undertake core learning objectives analysis of key sections.  Students particularly focus on language analysis and developing the skills necessary for GCSE reading responses. 

91a Effectively summarise and evaluate challenging texts

91b Use apt and precise quotations to support all my ideas

91c Effectively evaluate implied meanings and alternative interpretations suggested by quotations

92a Effectively analyse a range of the writer’s language methods, evaluating the impact on reader

92b Effectively analyse structural features, evaluating the impact on the reader

92c Use a range of subject terminology* (including word classes, grammatical terminology and terms for linguistic devices) with accuracy and apt supportive quotation

94a Evaluate different interpretations of the text informed by your understanding of the different contexts (social / historical / political / cultural / genre conventions) in which they have been written and received

97 Shape and paragraph my ideas skilfully in order to develop a cohesive and convincing argument

 

Much Ado About Nothing - Reading Assessment:

GCSE style essay (which students can plan in advance though) where they explore how a relationship between two characters is presented in the extract but also the play as a whole. Assessed on all Reading Core learning objectives apart from the 93s comparison Core learning objectives

Romeo and Juliet – Reading Assessment:

GCSE style essay (which students can plan in advance though) where they explore how the parent-child relationship is presented in the extract but also the play as a whole. Assessed on all Reading Core learning objectives apart from the 93s comparison

 

Literature from other cultures

Students read the novel ‘Of Mice and Men’, exploring the thematic issues and how contextual factors have influenced the text’s ideas and style. They also develop their skills in analysing how the writer uses language, form and structure to convey meaning, and develop ability to empathise with characters.

91a Effectively summarise and evaluate challenging texts

91b Use apt and precise quotations to support all my ideas

91c Effectively evaluate implied meanings and alternative interpretations suggested by quotations

92a Effectively analyse a range of the writer’s language methods, evaluating the impact on reader

92b Effectively analyse structural features, evaluating the impact on the reader

92c Use a range of subject terminology* (including word classes, grammatical terminology and terms for linguistic devices) with accuracy and apt supportive quotation

94a Evaluate different interpretations of the text informed by your understanding of the different contexts (social / historical / political / cultural / genre conventions) in which they have been written and received

 

Language Paper 1 Reading questions on extract from the final chapter

 

Possible speaking and listening group presentation on a contextual factor and how it influences novel if have done reading assessments for Shakespeare and contemporary novel

‘Comparing Viewpoints’

Paper 2 non-fiction reading scheme

 

 

GCSE Reading AOs (Language)

AO1

AO2

AO3

End of year exam: Reading section assesses the skills taught in this unit

GCSE preparation (after May half term))

Jekyll and Hyde

Practice speaking and listening presentation

GCSE Literature Assessment Objectives – especially AO3 (context)

N/A

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Page Documents Date  
Y7 Recommended Reading List 12th Jan 2021 Download
Y8 Recommended Reading List 12th Jan 2021 Download
Y9 Recommended Reading List 12th Jan 2021 Download