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History

Our aim is that our History Curriculum should promote interest within our students and lead them to a wider and deeper understanding of the world in which we live. We aim to equip our students with the skills Picture1they need to be critical thinkers who are able to communicate complicated ideas. History is important; it is our collective memory. It shapes how we think about the place we live in and our role in the world. History encompasses key moments of national importance as well as key concepts like, revolution, democracy and empire. History is also personal as it challenges our students to think about themselves and how they think about the ‘individual’. We want our students to become skilful Historians who can select and analyse evidence, write extensively, interpret questions and think critically. Above all the study of History at Sale Grammar School is interesting and engaging!.  

KS3 Curriculum - Course of Study 

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9 (in 2022)

Autumn Term 1

· What is History?

· How did the ancient world shape your life?

· How powerful were 17th & 18th century monarchs?

 

· How did democracy come under threat in the Interwar years?

· To what extent Jews persecuted before the Holocaust?

· How were the Nazi able to implement the “Final Solution”?

· Why did Britain win World War Two?

Autumn Term 2

· Was the Norman Conquest really so significant?

· Why did medieval people build such glorious Cathedrals, but live in such simple houses?  

· Why was the Archbishop of Canterbury murdered?

· How united was the United Kingdom?

· Why do Britain and the USA have a “special relationship”?

Spring Term 1

· Could Medieval Kings always do what they wanted?

· How “hard” was life in the Middle Ages?

· “From this filthy sewer pure gold flows”. Is this the best way to describe Victorian Manchester?

· Should the British Empire be a source of national pride?

· Was the “Mother Country” a good mum?

· How do you fight a Cold War?

· “We’ve never had it so good”; has that been the story of post-war Britain?

 

Spring Term 2

· Why were the Peasants Revolting?

· Are Medieval wars worth remembering?

· How important were women in the War of the Roses?     

· Should the British Empire be a source of national pride?

· How democratic was Britain in the 19th century?

 

Summer Term 1

· Did Henry VIII line up to his public image?

· Why were Mary I and MQA such controversial figures?  

· What’s the truth about Victorian and Edwardian women?

· How would you commemorate the First World War?

 

· Did the British Empire “jump” or was it “pushed”?

· Was religion the cause of the 9/11 attacks?

 

Summer Term 2

· Was the reign of Elizabeth I really a “Golden Age”?

· How would you commemorate the First World War?

 

Extra Curriculum
 
History society
 
KS3 Reading 
 
Slide1 Slide2  Slide3
Key Stage 4
 
KS4 reading list
Key Stage 5
 
KS5 Reading lists Page 1
 

Key Stage 3 Learning Objectives

YEAR 7 CORE LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Chronology

  • Sequence events e.g. a timeline
  • Divide the past up in to different periods of time
  • Identify some difference and similarities between periods of time

Knowledge and understanding. Students can provide:

  • Some causes
  • Some results of events
  • Some changes
  • Identify differences in people’s lives
  • Use dates and historical terms in their work

Evidence

  • Use sources of information to answer questions about the past
  • Describe the source or rewrite parts of the source

Significance

  • Identify that some events, people and changes were really important

Interpretation

  • Understand that the past can be shown in different ways by different people
  • Identify some viewpoints
  • Identify positive and negative language

 

Autumn Term 1

  • What is History?
  • How did the ancient world shape your life?

Autumn Term 2

  • Was the Norman Conquest really so significant?
  • Why did medieval people build such glorious Cathedrals, but live in such simple houses?  
  • Why was the Archbishop of Canterbury murdered?  

Spring Term 1

  • Could Medieval Kings always do what they wanted?
  • How “hard” was life in the middle ages?

Spring Term 2

  • Why were the Peasants Revolting?
  • Are Medieval wars worth remembering?
  • How important were women in the War of the Roses?     

Summer Term 1

  • Did Henry VIII line up to his public image?
  • Why were Mary I and MQA such controversial figures?  

Summer Term 2

  • Was the reign of Elizabeth I really a “Golden Age”?

YEAR 8 CORE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Chronology

  • Describe in detail features of past societies
  • Explain why there are similarities and differences between periods

Knowledge and understanding

  • Make links between causes, consequences and events
  • Show how one cause led to another
  • Explain which differences there were in History
  • Explain how big these differences were in people’s lives in the past
  • Write in a structured way
  • Use connectives to link paragraphs
  • Reach a supported conclusion

Evidence

  • Identify what the sources say can be different
  • Identify which sources are useful for the task

Significance

  • Explain which events, people and changes could be judged as more important than others could and give reasons why

Interpretation

  • Provide reasons why events, people and changes have been interpreted in different ways
Autumn Term 1
  • How powerful were 17th and 18th century monarchs?
Autumn Term 2
  • How united was the United Kingdom
  • Why do Britain and the USa have a "special relationship"?
Spring Term 1
  • "From the filthy sewer pure gold flows". is this the best way to describe Victorian Manchester?
  • Should the British Empire be a source of national pride?
Spring Term 2
  • Should the British Empire be a source of national pride?
  • How democratic was Britain in the 19th century?
Summer Term 1
  • What's the truth about Victorian and Edwardian woman?
  • How would you commemorate the First World War?
Summer Term 2
  • How would you commemorate the First World War?

YEAR 9 CORE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Chronology

  • Explain different societies and periods from British and international History and make links between features within and across different periods
  • Compare what life was like in different places and times and pick out the similarities and differences

Knowledge and understanding

  • Explain the links between cause, consequences and events
  • Breakdown and organise causes e.g. in terms of importance and long term, short term
  • Explain why and give reasons why different people’s lives in the past were different
  • Reach a balanced conclusion
  • Use specialised historical vocabulary effectively and timely
  • Use relevant and appropriate quotes to support your argument
  • Write a well-structured, analytical piece of work

Evidence

  • Evaluate strengths and weaknesses of sources through examining reliability and utility
  • Use sources to support your argument
  • Identify the nature, origin and purpose of a source

Significance

  • Use criteria to explain which events, people and changes could be judged as more important than others

Interpretation

  • Explain why there are different interpretations of events in History
  • Evaluate which interpretation you think is most valid 
Autumn Term 1 & 2
  • How did democracy come under threat in the interwar years?
  • To what extent Jews persecuted before the Holocaust? 
  • How were the Nazi able to implement the "final solution"
  • Why did Britain win World War Two? 
Spring Term 1 & 2
  • Was the " Mother Country" a good mum? 
  • How do you fight Cold War?
  • We've never has it so good; has that been the story of post-war Britain?
Summer Term 1 & 2
  • Did the British Empire "jump" or was it "pushed"?
  • Was religion the cause of the 9/11 attacks?

 

 

Key Stage 4 Learning Objectives

Overview

Students will follow the AQA Specification, which enables students to study a broader spectrum of History including; 50% British History, a thematic sweep through 1000 Humantiesyears and in-depth studies into Korea and Vietnam. The course will therefore provide students with an understanding of some of the key events which have shaped the country and world we live in today.

The GCSE course is interesting and always very popular, building on the skills students have developed in Key Stage 3. It is an academic subject which develops source evaluation skills and the ability to write extended answers; both of which are used extensively during the two years.

Assessment

The course is assessed in two units, as follows and has no Non-Examined Assessment (NEA)

Paper 1: 

Understanding the modern world” will be studied in Year 10. 

Unit 1  

America, 1920-1973: opportunity and inequality. This period of study focuses on the development of the USA during a turbulent half century of change. It was a period of opportunity and inequality – when some Americans lived the 'American Dream' whilst others grappled with the nightmare of poverty, discrimination and prejudice.

 

Unit 2     

Conflict and tension in Asia 1950-1975. This wider world depth study enables students to understand the complex and diverse interests of different states and individuals and the ideologies they represented. It focuses on the causes and events of the Cold War in Asia, specifically the Korean and Vietnam wars, and why it proved difficult to resolve the tensions which arose.

Paper 1 is assessed in a 2-hour examination and accounts for 50% of the overall marks.

 

Paper 2:

Shaping the nation” will be taught in Year 11.

Unit 1  

Britain: Migration, empires and the people: c790 to the present day. This thematic study will enable students to gain an understanding of how the identity of the people of Britain have been shaped by their interaction with the wider world. It will consider the ebb and flow of peoples into and out of Britain and evaluate their motives and achievements. It considers the causes, impact and legacy of Empire upon the ruled and the ruling in the context of Britain’s acquisition and retreat from Empire.

 

Unit 2     

Elizabethan England, c1568-1603. This British depth study focuses on major events of Elizabeth I’s reign - considered from economic, religious, political, social and cultural standpoints, and arising contemporary and historical controversies. This unit also includes the study of an historical site, which is chosen by the AQA every year.

Paper 2, like Paper 1, is assessed via a 2-hour exam with 50% of the overall marks.  Both exams will be sat at the end of Year 11.

 

Key Stage 5 Learning Objectives

Why Study History 

  • Simply because you love it – a genuine interest and passion in the subject is a must!
  • The skills you acquire, such as research skills and    the    ability   to    construct    supported arguments and answers, are highly valued by employers and universities.
  • History feeds into a wide range of careers and professions e.g. law, journalism, accountancy, human resources, a wide variety of graduate schemes and, of course, teaching!
  • Enjoy reading about the subject.
  • Its reputation – it is viewed as one of the most rigorous  and  academic  A-Levels by universities.
  • The Year 13 Historical Investigation (NEA) will help you prepare for university life and independent study.

Our Department

  • Staffed  by  four  History  graduates  who  love their subject!
  • Teaches the AQA History A-Level.
  • Well  stocked  with  textbooks  specifically written for A-Level examinations, with plenty of additional reading material available also.

Need more information?

We offer two different A-Level History Courses:

Course 1: Conflict

A LEVEL

HIS1C The Tudors:

England, 1485 - 1603

 

 

 

Taught by Miss Mattox

HIS2K America:

A Nation Divided,

1845-1877

 

Taught by Miss

Wilkinson

Unit 3 Historical Investigation (NEA) Coursework – approximately 3500 words covering

the causes of the First World War

20% of A-Level

Completed throughout Year 13

 

 

Course 2: Power and People

A LEVEL

HIS1H Tsarist and

Communist Russia,

1855-1964

 

Taught by Miss Cooper

HIS2M Wars and

Welfare Britain in

Transition 1906-1957

 

Taught by Miss

Robinson

Unit 3 Historical Investigation (NEA) Coursework – approximately 3500 words covering

the Tudor dynasty

Completed throughout Year 13

Course requirements

  • Minimum  of  a  Grade  6  in GCSE  History  or  a similar subject (English, Geography, GCSE RS).
  • A committed, hardworking approach.
  • Willingness to read widely, with no aversion to writing essays or producing  lots of detailed notes!
  • Participation in seminar style lessons.